Featured Article from Conferencing

Video Conferencing Takes the Stage


February 16, 2018

I love to dance around my bedroom and house but definitely do not have the time to go to a dance studio for lessons. Sure, I could watch and mimic videos but who other than my cats is going to give me the proper feedback? Thanks to Skype and video conferencing capabilities, those who want to enhance their dance skills can do just that via webcams from the comfort of their own space.

Several styles of dance are virtually being offered including traditional Indian dance, ballet, salsa, ballroom, and swing. Professional dance teachers join the lessons for “face-to-face” training and private lessons as well as group dance parties so everyone can get into the groove.

The basics to setting up a proper webcam for the video conference dance lesson are simple: an HD camera with a wide-angle lens and solid zoom-automatic to accommodate range and movement. Additionally, finding quality speakers will be extremely beneficial for better sound to hear the exact beats and the instructor’s specific directions.

There is also the capability for screen sharing so once everyone the instructor is teaching begins to feel comfortable, group classes can be taught remotely. It becomes a great way to connect with others sharing the same desire to move and shake without having to leave the comfort of the living room.

This is also a great way to start a business if you are a dance instructor with video conferencing equipment. By offering one-on-one remote lessons to clients who may not have the time to go to typical dance studios, you are opening yourself up to a whole new marketplace.

All of this is of course to show how easily an enterprise can use remote conferencing technology to train employees in any number of complex skills and tools. With the right video conferencing setup, any employee can be made a subject matter expert faster and more effectively than ever before.

Video conferencing: changing the game in meetings, health, education, and now, dance instruction.




Edited by Ken Briodagh