Featured Article from Conferencing

Conferencing in Huddle Rooms Calls for Specific Technology


May 23, 2017

The huddle room is a great notion in conferencing; take a small room, fit it out with some simple technology, and gain the ability to connect not only within a small group but with other groups as well thanks to the conferencing equipment contained in that small room. It's a great way to engage in operational discussion or even low-level tactical discussion. Yet a huddle room is nothing without the right technology to back it up, a point a recent Revolabs webinar covered.

The webinar, which focused on the right collaboration technologies for huddle spaces, started off with an obvious but simple premise that must be agreed upon: different rooms have different technological needs. A system geared toward an auditorium would be wildly out of place in a huddle room, if for no other reason than sizes involved, and the material used in a large conference room might be only passingly similar to that used in a training room.

This requires a specific understanding of just what the huddle room is, and from there, what it needs. The huddle room is not meant to be a temporary structure, but rather a permanent emplacement geared toward ease of use and small groups. This means some specific requirements for such an environment that are much different from others in the field.

A huddle room is geared toward groups of between three and six, ideally, though there's some wiggle room in there.  The huddle room is designed to make for better collaboration and provide a more open work environment, a development that's welcome in conferencing. Sufficiently welcome, in fact, that there are between two and five times more huddle rooms in the field than there are meeting rooms, with 10 million meeting rooms and between 20 and 50 million huddle rooms.

Whether it's trying to provide value for the mobile workforce—sometimes someone working remotely needs to talk uninterrupted to a small group—or trying to connect small groups both within and without, the huddle room can be an intensely valuable option thanks to its versatility within that narrow focus. Since the huddle room can operate completely without conferencing technology—the whole point is that it's a small-group space—it can deliver value just within the building, or beyond with the right hardware.

Those who want to check out the entire webinar can do so by following this link, and there's a lot more insight on how to form and operate a huddle room from there. For now, though, suffice it to say that the huddle room can be conferencing's best friend, especially when dealing with the smaller group operation.



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