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Hear Me Now: Revolabs New Conference Phones are Microsoft Certified


June 01, 2015

In what is being hailed as a business coup and sure to ignite sales, Revolabs -- a premier provider of audio solutions for unified communications and enterprise collaboration – has just announced that its new conference phones have been certified for use with devices that run on Microsoft Windows OS and servers.

To qualify for this certification, the phones passed rigorous tests conducted using the Windows Hardware Certification Kit (HCK), a standard test framework used to certify hardware devices for interoperability with Windows, Revolabs said in a statement. The models mentioned are the FLX UC 500 USB conference phone and the FLX UC 1000 IP & USB conference phone.

“The Windows HCK certification is key to marketplace success because it assures customers that Revolabs devices are robust solutions and reliable for deployment in enterprises that leverage Windows operating systems,” Revolabs noted in a statement.

"This is an important milestone for our product line and a huge benefit for our end users," said Priti Mendiratta, Revolabs Product Manager. "IT network administrators and users need dependability and ease of use. They're getting that with our products, as well as a higher level of quality audio that is essential for effective conferencing. Users and administrators need to know that their digital phone technology will work with their PCs, and this certification gives them the confidence they need to make cost-effective decisions," she added.

Both designated phones are now part of an elite group of products authorized to wear the "Compatible with Windows" badge. These phones incorporate sophisticated digital signal processing (DSP) technologies that Revolabs developed for its professional audio solutions that have now been adapted for the unified communications market.

Revolabs is a leader in conferencing as its solutions cut the cord, facilitating natural mobility by allowing participants to move about a workspace and still be heard, without being held back by wires.




Edited by Stefania Viscusi